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#1: Kansas City Chiefs Jersey Author: huangjian123 PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2019 1:21 am
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WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time since 2011 Hector Rondon Jersey , the Washington Nationals will go through a season without any help from Bryce Harper.So it’s rather likely this year will be viewed, at least in part, as a referendum on whether the Nationals should have figured out a way to keep the young slugger.“Everyone wants this answer: Is it better or worse without him? You can’t say one way or the other. Our chemistry and our vibe — whatever you want to call it — is really good. It’s one of the best that we’ve had in years. And people will read that and say: ‘Oh, well, because Bryce is gone.’ No, it has nothing to do with that,” Nationals first baseman Ryan Zimmerman said. “If he re-signed here, and we signed all these other guys as well, it could be the same. You don’t know. Everyone wants to talk about (Harper), which I get, but I think everyone in here is really happy with the group we have.”This much is clear: It’s a significantly different group.General manager Mike Rizzo remade more than a third of the roster after the Nationals went 82-80 and missed the playoffs following two NL East titles in a row.Max Scherzer, for one, was not surprised at all to see Washington sign free agent after free agent and add a couple of other players via trade.“I mean, here’s the reality of it: When you lose, and you fail as a team, you’re probably going to have some roster turnover http://www.astrosfanproshop.com/authentic-justin-verlander-jersey ,” said Scherzer, a three-time Cy Young Award winner. “That’s just how it is in baseball. Last year was a failure for us, so our front office wanted to make changes across the board. Now we just want to get everybody on the same page.”That job falls to manager Dave Martinez, whose second season in charge begins March 28 at home against the division rival New York Mets.“Hopefully,” Rizzo said, “I gave him the right parts.”Harper is no longer around after playing his first seven seasons in Washington, making six All-Star teams and winning Rookie of the Year and MVP awards. He left to sign a $330 million, 13-year contract with the Philadelphia Phillies after the Nationals offered $300 million with a significant chunk of it deferred.No one on the Nationals produced more homers (34), RBIs (100), walks (130) or runs (103) than Harper last season.“As good as Harper is, we had to bring in other pieces. Not just one guy, but multiple personnel,” Martinez said. “Not one guy is going to win games for you. They all have to do their job.”Some other things to know about the 2019 Washington Nationals:NEW FACESA rotation fronted by Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg added lefty Patrick Corbin for $140 million over six years and righty Anibal Sanchez. A bullpen that needed restocking added former closers Trevor Rosenthal (coming off reconstructive elbow surgery) and Kyle Barraclough, along with experienced lefty Tony Sipp. Two catchers came aboard, AL All-Star Yan Gomes and Kurt Suzuki. Brian Dozier takes over as the starting second baseman.ROOKIE TO WATCHA year after left fielder Juan Soto was a revelation at age 19, finishing as Rookie of the Year runner-up Jimmy Wynn Jersey , center fielder Victor Robles gets his shot at 21. Robles showed glimpses of his power and speed during a call-up last season. “I feel ready, physically and mentally,” Robles said through a translator.REAL ROTATIONNo “openers” here. Rizzo is a firm believer in the value of starting pitching in the most traditional sense. Having healthy and up-to-their-high-standards years from the top three members of the rotation not only will bring wins, it will ease the burden on the bullpen.GETTING RELIEFCloser Sean Doolittle is a known quantity; the rest of the rebuilt relief corps could be the real key to Washington’s success. “They say the last three outs are the hardest to get,” Doolittle said. “But they’re not always the most important.” FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) — Boston Globe baseball writer Nick Cafardo, who covered the Red Sox and the rest of the sport for more than three decades, died Thursday after collapsing outside the team’s spring training clubhouse. He was 62.The newspaper said Cafardo appeared to have an embolism. The team’s medical staff responded quickly but was unable to revive him.“The world is darker today without @nickcafardo. His fairness, love for the game and great heart made fans of us all,” baseball star-turned-broadcaster Alex Rodriguez wrote on Twitter . “We will miss you from field to booth, Nick.”The Red Sox said they were saddened by Cafardo’s death and would find the appropriate time to honor his legacy.“For over three decades, Nick was a fixture at Fenway Park and throughout ballparks across the country. His coverage was as consistent as the game itself,” the team said in a statement. “The Cafardo family will always be a part of the Boston baseball family.”Cafardo joined the Globe in 1989 from The (Quincy) Patriot Ledger, where he had been on the baseball beat. He continued to cover the Red Sox before switching to the New England Patriots in time for the team’s first NFL championship, in 2001.He returned to baseball and has covered the Red Sox and the major leagues for the past 15 years, writing a Sunday notes package and an “On Baseball” column that kept New England’s fervent baseball fans in touch with their team and the rest of the major leagues.“Nick Cafardo was a man whose talent http://www.astrosfanproshop.com/authentic-justin-verlander-jersey , enthusiasm, and contribution to Boston’s sports coverage was incomparable and something that I always enjoyed reading,” Boston Mayor Marty Walsh tweeted.Cafardo collapsed on the sidewalk between the ballpark and the batting cages where players were working out to prepare for the defense of their World Series title. The newspaper said it was his day off, but “Cafardo’s love of baseball and commitment to his craft compelled him to report to JetBlue Park.”“Nick was one of the best people to ever walk through our doors — generous with his time and insights, immensely knowledgeable, deeply devoted to the Globe,” editor Brian McGrory said in the paper’s obituary.“He had a view of the Red Sox and the game on a national scale that is virtually unrivaled. For those reasons, he was one of our most read writers, constantly attracting followers near and far, his weekly baseball notes column being destination reading for tens of thousands of people.”In addition to his coverage for the paper, Cafardo also wrote a book on the beginning of the Patriots dynasty, “The Impossible Team: The Worst to First Patriots’ Super Bowl Season.” He also wrote “If These Walls Could Talk” with Red Sox second baseman and broadcaster Jerry Remy and “Inside Pitch: Playing and Broadcasting the Game I Love,” with Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Glavine.“The Major League Baseball and sports journalism communities suffered a tremendous loss today,” the Players Association said in a statement. “



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