Plants World
   Login or Register
HomeCommunity ForumsMy Account
Community Forums › Trees & Shrubs › Trees › Ginko biloba
Toggle Content Search:
Toggle Content Main Menu
 Home Community Members options Forums Search Web Identication
 Contest01
 Links
Toggle Content MiniChat
emojitv: https://ufc237.de
07-May-2019 10:03:39
Allovevirginhair: hello
09-Apr-2019 08:48:34
Marcus: Hi guys!
02-Sep-2016 10:03:34
Tedus: how are you ? Smile Very Happy
04-Nov-2015 07:09:02
Marcus: Hi Tedus
24-Jun-2015 08:16:09
Tedus: Someone on forum???
14-Feb-2015 16:58:39
plantsandstuff: i need a plant identified
08-Dec-2012 17:42:05
Marcus: almost Smile
27-Oct-2012 18:29:42
Pljoska: is someone there Smile
28-May-2012 02:54:58
Marcus: Hello people Smile
01-Apr-2012 13:34:46
Shout History
Only Registered Users can Shout
Create/Login
Toggle Content User info:

Welcome Anonymous

Nickname
Security CodeSecurity Code
Type Code

Membership:
Latest: Blocing56
New Today: 1
New Yesterday: 11
Overall: 2272

People Online:
Members: 2
Visitors: 40
Bots: 2
Staff: 0

Članovi online:

 01:  Blocing56
 02:  stateoforigin


Toggle Content Translation

Ginko biloba


Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer Friendly Page     Forum Index -> Trees
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Marcus
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Jan 24, 2007
Posts: 207
Location: Belgrade

PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 11:07 am    Post subject: Ginko biloba Reply with quote

What is the best time to collect seeds of Ginko ?

_________________
Svet Biljaka | GdeNaMore
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number Photo Gallery
Isomorphix
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: Feb 20, 2007
Posts: 339
Location: Vancouver, Canada (zone 8b)

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:55 am    Post subject: Re: Ginko biloba Reply with quote

Not as easy for me to answer this one, Marcus, but in our area, now is the right time as the seeds are finished forming. This pdf file explains about seed collecting so may prove helpful. I've never tried growing them as they're not my favourite tree & I have only limited space from trees or large shrubs at my home.

www.urbanforestrysouth...s/Library/ ginkgo-seed-collection-preparation/at_download/file_name

_________________
I'll try to grow almost anything if I can get seeds or cuttings from a plant or fruit. It's a challenge!
Back to top
View user's profile Photo Gallery
Pljoska
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: Oct 27, 2010
Posts: 135
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 6:31 am    Post subject: Re: Ginko biloba Reply with quote

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba; in Chinese and Japanese 銀杏, pinyin romanization: yín xìng, Hepburn romanization: ichō or ginnan), also spelled gingko and known as the Maidenhair Tree, is a unique species of tree with no close living relatives. The tree is widely cultivated and introduced, since an early period in human history, and has various uses as a food and traditional medicine.
Back to top
View user's profile
Pljoska
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: Oct 27, 2010
Posts: 135
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 6:31 am    Post subject: Re: Ginko biloba Reply with quote

Although Ginkgo biloba and other species of the genus were once widespread throughout the world, the tree currently occurs in the wild only in the northwest of Zhejiang province in the Tianmu Shan mountain reserve in eastern China, but even its status as a naturally occurring species there is questionable. In other areas of China it has been long cultivated and it is common in the southern third of the country.[10] It has also been commonly cultivated in North America for over 200 years, but during that time it has never become significantly naturalised.[11]

For centuries it was thought to be extinct in the wild, but is now known to grow in at least two small areas in Zhejiang province in Eastern China, in the Tian Mu Shan Reserve. However, recent studies indicate high genetic uniformity among ginkgo trees from these areas, arguing against a natural origin of these populations and suggesting that the ginkgo trees in these areas may have been planted and preserved by Chinese monks over a period of about 1,000 years.[12] Whether native ginkgo populations still exist has not been demonstrated unequivocally.

Where it occurs in the wild it is found infrequently in deciduous forests and valleys on acidic loess (i.e. fine, silty soil) with good drainage. The soil it inhabits is typically in the pH range of 5 to 5.5
Back to top
View user's profile
Pljoska
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: Oct 27, 2010
Posts: 135
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 6:32 am    Post subject: Re: Ginko biloba Reply with quote

The species was initially described by the father of taxonomy Linnaeus in 1771, the specific epithet biloba derived from the Latin bis 'two' and loba 'lobed', referring to the shape of the leaves.[13] Two names for the species recognise the botanist Richard Salisbury, a placement by Nelson as Pterophyllus salisburiensis and the earlier Salisburia adiantifolia proposed by James Edward Smith. The epithet of the latter may have been intended to denote a characteristic resembling Adiantum, the genus of maidenhair ferns.[14]

The relationship of Ginkgo to other plant groups remains uncertain. It has been placed loosely in the divisions Spermatophyta and Pinophyta, but no consensus has been reached. Since Ginkgo seeds are not protected by an ovary wall, it can morphologically be considered a gymnosperm. The apricot-like structures produced by female ginkgo trees are technically not fruits, but are seeds that have a shell that consists of a soft and fleshy section (the sarcotesta), and a hard section (the sclerotesta).

The ginkgo is classified in its own division, the Ginkgophyta, comprising the single class Ginkgoopsida, order Ginkgoales, family Ginkgoaceae, genus Ginkgo and is the only extant species within this group. It is one of the best-known examples of a living fossil, because Ginkgoales other than G. biloba are not known from the fossil record after the Pliocene
Back to top
View user's profile
Pljoska
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: Oct 27, 2010
Posts: 135
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 6:32 am    Post subject: Re: Ginko biloba Reply with quote

The older Chinese name for this plant is 銀果 yínguǒ ('silver fruit'). The most usual names today are 白果 bái guǒ ('white fruit') and 銀杏 yínxìng ('silver apricot'). The former name was borrowed directly in Vietnamese (as bạch quả). The latter name was borrowed in Japanese (as ぎんなん "ginnan") and Korean (as 은행 "eunhaeng"), when the tree itself was introduced from China.

The scientific name Ginkgo appears to be due to a process akin to folk etymology. Chinese characters typically have multiple pronunciations in Japanese, and the characters 銀杏 used for ginnan can also be pronounced ginkyō. Engelbert Kaempfer, the first Westerner to see the species in 1690, wrote down this pronunciation in his Amoenitates Exoticae (1712) with the "awkward" spelling "Ginkgo". This appears to be a simple error of Kaempfer, taking his spelling of other Japanese words into account, a more precise romanization would have been "Ginkio" or "Ginkjo
Back to top
View user's profile
Pljoska
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: Oct 27, 2010
Posts: 135
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 6:33 am    Post subject: Re: Ginko biloba Reply with quote

The Ginkgo is a living fossil, with fossils recognisably related to modern Ginkgo from the Permian, dating back 270 million years. The most plausible ancestral group for the order Ginkgoales is the Pteridospermatophyta, also known as the "seed ferns," specifically the order Peltaspermales. The closest living relatives of the clade are the cycads,[18] which share with the extant G. biloba the characteristic of motile sperm. Fossils attributable to the genus Ginkgo first appeared in the Early Jurassic, and the genus diversified and spread throughout Laurasia during the middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. It declined in diversity as the Cretaceous progressed, and by the Paleocene, Ginkgo adiantoides was the only Ginkgo species left in the Northern Hemisphere while a markedly different (and poorly documented) form persisted in the Southern Hemisphere. At the end of the Pliocene, Ginkgo fossils disappeared from the fossil record everywhere except in a small area of central China where the modern species survived. It is doubtful whether the Northern Hemisphere fossil species of Ginkgo can be reliably distinguished. Given the slow pace of evolution and morphological similarity between members of the genus, there may have been only one or two species existing in the Northern Hemisphere through the entirety of the Cenozoic: present-day G. biloba (including G. adiantoides) and G. gardneri from the Paleocene of Scotland.[19]

At least morphologically, G. gardneri and the Southern Hemisphere species are the only known post-Jurassic taxa that can be unequivocally recognised. The remainder may have been ecotypes or subspecies. The implications would be that G. biloba had occurred over an extremely wide range, had remarkable genetic flexibility and, though evolving genetically, never showed much speciation. While it may seem improbable that a species may exist as a contiguous entity for many millions of years, many of the Ginkgo's life-history parameters fit. These are: extreme longevity; slow reproduction rate; (in Cenozoic and later times) a wide, apparently contiguous, but steadily contracting distribution coupled with, as far as can be demonstrated from the fossil record, extreme ecological conservatism (restriction to disturbed streamside environments).[20]


Fossil Ginkgo leaves from the Jurassic of EnglandModern-day G. biloba grows best in environments that are well-watered and drained,[21] and the extremely similar fossil Ginkgo favored similar environments: the sediment record at the majority of fossil Ginkgo localities indicates it grew primarily in disturbed environments along streams and levees.[20] Ginkgo therefore presents an "ecological paradox" because while it possesses some favorable traits for living in disturbed environments (clonal reproduction) many of its other life-history traits (slow growth, large seed size, late reproductive maturity) are the opposite of those exhibited by modern plants that thrive in disturbed settings.[22]

Given the slow rate of evolution of the genus, it is possible that Ginkgo represents a pre-angiosperm strategy for survival in disturbed streamside environments. Ginkgo evolved in an era before flowering plants, when ferns, cycads, and cycadeoids dominated disturbed streamside environments, forming a low, open, shrubby canopy. Ginkgo's large seeds and habit of "bolting" - growing to a height of 10 m before elongating its side branches - may be adaptions to such an environment. The fact that diversity in the genus Ginkgo drops through the Cretaceous (along with that of ferns, cycads, and cycadeoids) at the same time that flowering plants were on the rise, supports the notion that flowering plants with better adaptations to disturbance displaced Ginkgo and its associates over time.[23]

Ginkgo has been used for classifying plants with leaves that have more than four veins per segment, while Baiera for those with fewer than four veins per segment. Sphenobaiera has been used to classify plants with a broadly wedge-shaped leaf that lacks a distinct leaf stem. Trichopitys is distinguished by having multiple-forked leaves with cylindrical (not flattened) thread-like ultimate divisions; it is one of the earliest fossils ascribed to the Ginkgophyta.
Back to top
View user's profile
Pljoska
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: Oct 27, 2010
Posts: 135
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 6:33 am    Post subject: Re: Ginko biloba Reply with quote

Ginkgo has long been cultivated in China; some planted trees at temples are believed to be over 1,500 years old. The first record of Europeans encountering it is in 1690 in Japanese temple gardens, where the tree was seen by the German botanist Engelbert Kaempfer. Because of its status in Buddhism and Confucianism, the Ginkgo is also widely planted in Korea and parts of Japan; in both areas, some naturalization has occurred, with Ginkgos seeding into natural forests.

In some areas, most intentionally planted Ginkgos are male cultivars grafted onto plants propagated from seed, because the male trees will not produce the malodorous seeds. The popular cultivar 'Autumn Gold' is a clone of a male plant.

Ginkgos adapt well to the urban environment, tolerating pollution and confined soil spaces.[24] They rarely suffer disease problems, even in urban conditions, and are attacked by few insects.[25][26] For this reason, and for their general beauty, ginkgos are excellent urban and shade trees, and are widely planted along many streets.

Ginkgos are also popular subjects for growing as penjing and bonsai; they can be kept artificially small and tended over centuries. Furthermore, the trees are easy to propagate from seed.

Extreme examples of the Ginkgo's tenacity may be seen in Hiroshima, Japan, where six trees growing between 1–2 km from the 1945 atom bomb explosion were among the few living things in the area to survive the blast (photos and details). While almost all other plants (and animals) in the area were destroyed, the ginkgos, though charred, survived and were soon healthy again. The trees are alive to this day.

The ginkgo leaf is the symbol of the Urasenke school of Japanese tea ceremony. The tree is the national tree of China.
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer Friendly Page     Forum Index -> Trees All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1


Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

Toggle Content Last posts
Last 10 Forum Messages

https://pacquiaovsthurman.com/
Last post by stateoforigin in Plants Identification on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:36:34

Adidas Falcon Pink
Last post by Yazzie37 in Indoor Plants on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:22:31

Adidas Superstar 80s Verkauf
Last post by Yazzie37 in Plants Identification on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:20:45

Adidas Gazelle Günstig
Last post by Yazzie37 in Indoor Plants on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:17:53

Adidas Gazelle Vendita Online
Last post by Yazzie37 in Plants Identification on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:16:30

Nike Air Max 270 Soldes
Last post by Yazzie37 in Indoor Plants on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:13:32

Nike Air Max 270 Saldi
Last post by Yazzie37 in Plants Identification on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:11:42

Converse Chuck 70 Günstig
Last post by Yazzie37 in Indoor Plants on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:08:54

Nike Air Huarache Rebajas
Last post by Yazzie37 in Plants Identification on Jul 20, 2019 at 07:06:32

Some of the amazing health benefits of basil you never knew
Last post by kellykevin in Herbs on Jul 20, 2019 at 06:27:58

Toggle Content Last added pics

sehirus_luctuosus_5~1.jpg
sehirus_luctuosus_5~ ...


po20080417_0092.jpg
po20080417_0092.jpg


pea_aphid__macrosiphum_pisum_.jpg
pea_aphid__macrosiph ...


53_scan0016.jpg
53_scan0016.jpg


54_scan0017.jpg
54_scan0017.jpg


2004_grapes.jpg
2004_grapes.jpg


our_place_3.jpg
our_place_3.jpg


duncan_smith_msc_arps.jpg
duncan_smith_msc_arp ...


peucedanum_officinale.jpg
peucedanum_officinal ...


hurricane_zone_5.jpg
hurricane_zone_5.jpg


Photo Gallery

Toggle Content Facebook
Toggle Content Plants World
Toggle Content Survey
There are no surveys to display
Toggle Content Total Hits
We have received
22057525
page views since
January 24, 2007



Interactive software released under GNU GPL, Code Credits, Privacy Policy
.: Style by Bili :: Original Theme (FiSubBrownsh Shadow) by Daz :.